CMS: Stay tuned for final rule on hospital price transparency

hospital
As the Trump administration released final rules around physician reimbursement and site-neutral payments as part of the Outpatient Prospective Payment System, a proposal that would require hospitals to post "shoppable prices" remains on hold—at least for now. (Getty/peterspiro)

As the Trump administration released final rules Friday around physician reimbursement and site-neutral payments as part of the Outpatient Prospective Payment System (OPPS), a proposal that would require hospitals to post "shoppable prices" remains on hold—at least for now.

In July, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) released the proposal that every U.S. hospital participating in Medicare must publish the prices they negotiate with payers for standard services and items in a bid to boost transparency. The rule is supposed to go into effect Jan. 1, 2020, as part of its outpatient payment rule.

While portions of the OPPS were released Friday, officials said the proposed requirements for hospitals to make public a list of their standard charges garnered more than 1,400 comments. "We intend to summarize and respond to public comments on the proposed policies in a forthcoming final rule," officials said in a statement.

Webinar This Week

Optimizing Healthcare Operational Excellence to Drive Care Transformation

Join us in this webinar to learn how organizations have leveraged modern technology to enable transformative innovation and continuous improvement across their operations resulting in overall cost savings, process optimization, and clinical improvements.

RELATED: CMS finalizes physician fee schedule rule with cuts to physical therapists, psychologists

Suggested Articles

Workers’ contributions to their health plan premiums and deductibles increased at a faster rate than wages over the past decade.

The Trump administration released its regulatory agenda that includes estimates on when major rules on drug prices and interoperability will be out

David Feinberg, M.D., head of Google Health, posted a blog post and video Tuesday to directly address growing concerns about the Ascension data deal.