Hospital implements color-coded dress code; Preventable injuries cost hospitals $2B per year;

> Erlanger Health System employees now are color-coded by department and job under a new professional dress code that promotes staff morale and patient safety, reported the Chattanooga Times Free Press. Starting Jan. 1, all clinical staff must wear solid-color scrubs in a designated color, hospital-employed physicians must wear a white coat, while employees at T.C. Thompson Children's Hospital can wear "child-friendly" designs with department-colored pants. Article

> If labor talks shut down, Kaiser Permanente may see thousands of unionized nurses walk off the job Jan. 31 in a repeat of hospital strikes in September, noted The Sacramento Bee. Article

> Highmark struggles with filling hospital beds and integrating care in its $475 million acquisition of West Penn Allegheny Health System, according to the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review. Although getting patients back into hospitals beds is vital to yield profits, an integrated system must shift treatment away from hospitals, experts said. Article

> The South Florida Hospital Association is once again asking the legislature to ban guns in hospitals, reported the Miami Herald. Doctor groups last summer filed a federal lawsuit to overturn a Florida law that bans healthcare professionals from asking patients about whether they own guns. Article

> Preventable injuries cost Wisconsin hospitals $2 billion in medical costs each year, according to a new study from the Injury Research Center at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. Thanks to injuries, hospital costs per visit have skyrocketed from 2007 to 2009, reported the Green Bay Press Gazette. Article

And Finally... Powerful people think they're taller. Article

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