Carrot Fertility

Carrot partners with companies to fulfill these fertility dreams through employee benefit programs. (Carrot)

Carrot Fertility is a winner of FierceHealthcare's Fierce 15 awards. See our other honorees here.

 

When Tammy Sun and Asima Ahmad, MD, founded Carrot Fertility, they envisioned a team of global doctors and scientists working together to offer quality, inclusive fertility care for everyone regardless of age, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or marital status. 

Today, Carrot partners with companies to fulfill these fertility dreams through employee benefit programs. And, unique to other fertility benefit plans, Carrot covers the costs of adoption and surrogacy arrangements.

Addressing an important hole in the market, 68% of adults said they’d switch jobs to gain fertility benefits, according to a Carrot survey.

With the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, the company launched Carrot at Home, a telehealth program that combines AI-powered predictive analytics with virtual appointments.

In August, Carrot closed a $24 million Series B funding round led by U.S. Venture Partners, bringing its total capital raised to more than $40 million.

Carrot has tripled its growth—now serving 200 companies—and in 2021, plans to support U.S. multinational companies in more than 50 countries. In addition, Carrot launched a suite of new products including Carrot at Home, a telehealth program that combines AI-powered predictive analytics with virtual appointments. 

"The pandemic has increased the urgency of ensuring people have access to fertility healthcare--whether at clinics or at home. Now more than ever, employers seek flexible and focused solutions that can be customized to their business needs," Sun said in a statement. 


Fierce insights from Tammy Sun, CEO of Carrot

Tammy Sun (Carrot)

What is your best piece of advice for launching a healthcare company that challenges the status quo?

Embrace your beginner’s mind to reimagine what is possible. Don’t let experts or those with more experience in healthcare tell you “no” without investigating it fully for yourself.

What is the failure you’ve learned the best lesson from?

Most failures have been because I let others’ opinions override my own intuition. So, the lesson is to take your intuition and independent thinking seriously. What is the book you recommend to other healthcare leaders? Mountains Beyond Mountains, by Tracy Kidder. It's a beautiful story about health equity, and how it's entirely possible to provide excellent care to even the world's poorest people.

What is the biggest change to watch for in the healthcare industry in 2021?

Fertility care will crescendo globally as a must-have part of fundamental human healthcare. Employers and patients will demand more flexibility and personalization in how they access this type of care.

In light of the national conversation that is happening right now, what advice would you offer to healthcare leaders seeking to make a real impact on systemic problems of racism?

Start with humility. Admit mistakes and failures, and then build from there. There is so much opportunity for improvement, but none of it happens unless leaders step up to the plate and take responsibility for making the future better than the status quo. Think of yourself as one of those leaders. And don’t wait for someone else to do it because that might never happen.

What is the biggest lesson your company has gained as a result of responding to COVID-19?

Turn off your video! It’s okay to have meetings by phone or audio-only. Having frequent and periodic breaks from being “on-air” can be an important salve, especially since we now spend so much more of the workday on video chats.

Carrot Fertility
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