In shifting healthcare landscape, find ways to keep physicians and staff satisfied

care team
In a changing environment, it's a challege to keep physicians and staff happy.

Both physicians and staff must adapt to rapid changes in medicine, but keeping both camps happy is a challenge.

That's why practices are coming up with ideas to help people stay satisfied in their jobs, according to Physicians Practice. It starts by hiring the right staff, then continues with determining the right mix of routine profit sharing and bonuses to retain them and keep them motivated.

RELATED: 4 tips to hire and retain office staff

Some other suggestions from the article and previous FierceHealthcare coverage:

  1. Consider new practice models: For many doctors, switching to a direct primary care practice is the answer, as it eliminates both government regulators and insurance companies, allowing them to focus on patients. One doctor described it as getting off the assembly line. Others are joining collaborative arrangements, such as clinically integrated networks or accountable care organizations, which reward them for providing good clinical care.
  2. Offer flex schedules: To encourage a better work-life balance, FierceHealthcare previously reported that some organizations give physicians flexible work schedules, so they can start the workday earlier or later, or work longer hours certain days a week so they can leave earlier on other days.
  3. Show appreciation: Practices are also being creative in keeping staff happy at their jobs. For example, Physicians Practice noted that at Performance Pediatrics in Plymouth, Massachusetts, Administrative Director Leann DiDomenico McCallister takes staff members out to lunch while the practice’s doctor, Terence McCallister, M.D., stays at the office, manning the front desk and answering calls. Another way to appreciate staff: Consider offering small prizes and rewards to recognize teach members’ accomplishments.

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