Many Americans don’t have a primary care doctor

Doctor
Many Americans report they don't have a primary care doctor.

Some 28% of U.S. men and 17% of women don’t have a personal doctor or healthcare provider, according to a government survey.

The problem is worse among minorities, according to an analysis by the Kaiser Family Foundation of data provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 2013-2015 survey results. For instance, almost half of Hispanic men (47%) report they don’t have a primary care physician.

The data is based on a randomly dialed telephone survey of adults age 18 and older. The report provides a breakdown by state and by race/ethnicity. Here are some highlights of the report:

Conference

2019 Drug Pricing and Reimbursement Stakeholder Summit

Given federal and state pricing requirements arising, press releases from industry leading pharma companies, and the new Drug Transparency Act, it is important to stay ahead of news headlines and anticipated requirements in order to hit company profit targets, maintain value to patients and promote strong, multi-beneficial relationships with manufacturers, providers, payers, and all other stakeholders within the pricing landscape. This conference will provide a platform to encourage a dialogue among such stakeholders in the pricing and reimbursement space so that they can receive a current state of the union regarding regulatory changes while providing actionable insights in anticipation of the future.

Among men, 23% of whites say they don’t have a personal doctor, a number that jumps to 31% of blacks, 47% of Hispanics, 30% of Asians, native Hawaiians or Pacific Islanders and 36% of American Indians or Alaskan natives.

Among women, 13% of whites say they don’t have a personal doctor, which increases to 18% of blacks, 33% of Hispanics, 21% of Asians, native Hawaiians or Pacific Islanders and 25% of American Indians or Alaska natives.

The survey also found that 17% of U.S. women did not see a doctor in the past year because of cost and 19% reported fair or poor health status. States with the highest number of women without primary care doctors were Nevada and Texas, where 28% of women said they did not have a personal doctor.

The states with the highest number of men without primary care doctors were Alaska (42%) and Nevada (41%). Some 17% of men reported fair or poor health status.

The Association of American Medical Colleges estimates the U.S. could lose as many as 100,000 doctors by 2025 and primary care physicians are already in short supply, particularly in rural areas.

Suggested Articles

Blue Shield of California has teamed up with Landmark Health to offer more home health visits to members with chronic conditions.

People still have trust in their doctors, according to a new survey.

Telemedicine might not be the silver bullet to improve rural healthcare.