Journal pulls article over gender gaffe that refers to surgeons with only male pronouns

Women doctors
A medical journal is apologizing for its gender gaffe.

A medical journal apologized and pulled an article that referred to surgeons using male pronouns throughout. 

“This does not represent our views at Annals of Surgery and we sincerely apologize for this oversight in our production process,” the publication's editors said in a statement after readers pointed out the gaffe. “Unfortunately our own editorial review did not catch the singular use of male pronouns to refer to surgeons.” 

RELATED: Another glass ceiling: Women get zero respect when it comes to medical society awards

Whitepaper

Elevate Health Plan Member Engagement Through Call Center Transformation

Learn how health plans can rapidly transform their call center operations and provide high-touch, concierge service to health plan members.

The article will be republished with gender inclusive language, the board said.

It’s not the first time that women physicians have spoken out about biasnot by a long shot. Last fall, social media exploded after a flight attendant turned down the help of a young black female doctor--assuming she couldn’t be a real physician. That controversy birthed the hashtag #whatadoctorlookslike.

Last week, a new study that looked at who receives recognition awards from medical societies found zero or near-zero representation of women physicians.

Lead author Julie K. Silver, M.D., said the report isn’t really about the awards, it’s about opening doors for women physicians.

RELATED: Dear Delta—this is what 'actual physicians' look like

The Annals of Surgery article, “Modern Surgeon: Still a Master of His Trade or Just an Operator of Medical Equipment?” was a published copy of the presidential address of the European Surgical Association delivered by Marek Krawczyk.

On a Retraction Watch blog, editor Keith D. Lillemoe pointed out the address was delivered in April by the past ESA president in Polish. The Polish pronoun “his,” he said, is not gender specific.

Suggested Articles

Nearly 10,000 patients involved in research studies were impacted by a third-party privacy breach that may have exposed their medical diagnoses.

Employers looking to continue investing in their wellness programs are eyeing services targeting mental health and women’s health, a new survey shows.

Payers have made strides digitizing and automating many core processes, yet prior authorization remains a largely manual, cumbersome process.