Asking patients to review your practice online

line of stars
Doctors should ask patients to write online reviews.

With more patients using online reviews to find a new doctor, it’s understandable that physicians and practices want to strengthen their online ratings. And there's nothing wrong with asking patients for help.

“When a patient is a promoter of the practice and has an amazing story to tell, we ask if they would mind sharing on social media, and they usually are very willing to do so,” Janice Johnston, M.D., a primary care physician at Arrowhead Health Centers in Glendale, Arizona, told Medical Economics.

RELATED: Study—Physician-rating websites don’t provide meaningful information

Whitepaper

Key Realities Pushing Healthcare Into a Digital Future

Paper forms, contracts, and documents are the quicksand that bogs down both patient care and provider business. However, that does not have to be the case. Download this whitepaper to learn the three key realities that are pushing healthcare past paper-based processes and into a digital, more streamlined future.

Don’t be too pushy, but if a patient has made several positive comments to you, ask them to do the same online. Ask staff to encourage patients to leave a review and then follow through by using those positive patient reviews in your marketing.

And make it easy for patients to find and leave reviews by listing your practice on popular sites.

RELATED: Convert negative online reviews into wins for your practice

By the way, it’s a big mistake not to respond if you discover an unhappy patient has posted negative or inaccurate comments. You want to respond and provide your point of view, but do so carefully so you don’t violate patient confidentiality and privacy. 

A 2016 survey by a software research and rating company found 77% of patients use online reviews to find their next doctor.

Suggested Articles

While it continues to oppose “Medicare for All,” the American Medical Association has dropped out of a coalition organized to fight the proposal.

Experts who examined 21 California cases in which extreme risk protection orders were used suggest they can play a role in preventing mass shootings.

The opioid epidemic prompted some medical centers and groups of physicians to establish surgery-specific prescribing guidelines. How have they worked?