Fertility doctor fathered dozens; USC program stripped of accreditation

social determinants
According to media reports, DNA evidence indicates a Dutch fertility doctor fathered dozens of his patients' children. (noipornpan/GettyImages)

Dutch fertility doctor fathered dozens of children

In a case that has riveted the Netherlands, a Dutch fertility doctor lied to patients and fathered at least 49 children and possibly more.

More people in the Netherlands are now checking whether they may be the offspring of the deceased doctor, Jan Karbaat, who used his own sperm to inseminate some of his patients, according to the Associated Press.

DNA testing has confirmed that Karbaat is the biological father of 49 children, a number that could grow as publicity surrounding the case has more people with a possible connection seeking to check their DNA against the doctor’s, the AP reported. The real number could be higher and spread beyond the Netherlands, even as far as the U.S., the news service reported.

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Karbaat’s fertility clinic was ordered closed in 2009 by a Dutch government healthcare agency because of poor administration and record keeping. The doctor died in 2017 at age 89.

USC fellowship program stripped of accreditation

The University of Southern California’s cardiovascular disease fellowship is being forced to close after the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) moved to revoke its accreditation, according to the Los Angeles Times.

The ACGME formally notified USC and Los Angeles County, which jointly run the fellowship program, that it will pull its accreditation next year, effectively shutting it down, the newspaper said.

While the accreditor did not publicly state the reason for its action, a memo released to faculty said the decision was based on concerns about “resident safety and wellness processes.”

The decision follows sexual assault allegations by three women against a physician who was working and training at the Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center. A medical resident filed a lawsuit accusing the doctor, who was a fellow in the program, of sexual assault and also alleged school officials did not take her complaint seriously.

Pediatric surgeon loses license over child porn

The Missouri medical board revoked the license of a pediatric surgeon arrested in 2016 on child pornography charges, according to the Kansas City Star.

The board revoked the license of Guy Rosenschein, M.D., more than two years after he was arrested in New Mexico on those charges. He is facing at least 16 lawsuits from the families of former patients who allege that he inappropriately touched or photographed their children during exams or surgeries, the newspaper said.

Doctors who co-founded pain clinics accused of fraud

Federal prosecutors intend to file a lawsuit against the co-owners of a now-closed pain clinic company, which was based in Tennessee, according to the Associated Press.

The lawsuit against Comprehensive Pain Specialists will name several owners, including co-founding anesthesiologists Peter Kroll, M.D., and Steven Dickerson, M.D., who is a Republican state senator representing Nashville, according to a Kaiser Health News report.

The company, which once operated in 12 states but abruptly shut down last summer, was the target of at least five whistleblower lawsuits accusing it of defrauding Medicare and other health insurers of millions of dollars from unnecessary urine drug tests, dishonest billing and falsified documents.

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