Washington bill allows out-of-state insurers; UPMC Health Plan enrollment soars 13 percent;

> A survey conducted Wednesday by Reimbursement Intelligence shows that 40 percent of 15 large health plans said they expect the new contraception requirement to increase costs through higher pharmacy expenses, Reuters reported. The survey also found the following: 20 percent of insurers think costs would even out because their premiums already budget for contraception, 6.7 percent said it would drive up pharmacy costs but decrease medical costs and 33.3 percent weren't sure. Article

> Legislation in Washington would open up the health insurance market to out-of-state insurers, reported the Lake Chelan Mirror. The bill (S.B. 6440) would direct the Washington commissioner office to identify at least five states with which it can establish reciprocal agreements, allowing the sale of individual and small-group policies between those states and Washington. Article

> UPMC Health Plan's enrollment in its Medicare Advantage plans has grown 13.6 percent in the last year, according to the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review. Membership in its six Medicare Advantage plans on Jan. 1 was 92,617, which amounted to an additional 11,072 members more than its 2011 enrollment. Article

> The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has concluded its review of states' requests to be exempted from the medical-loss ratio requirement. In all, HHS rejected 10 state requests and approved exemptions, some of which it modified, for seven states, reported The Hill's Healthwatch. Article

> Highmark's chief legal officer Maureen Hogel resigned suddenly on Wednesday, and the insurer isn't disclosing the reasons behind the departure, reported the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Article

> And Finally... Perhaps "Heart Attack Grill" isn't the wisest name for a restaurant. Article

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