Molina Healthcare of Utah and Health Integrated Partner to Increase Services for Medicaid and Dual-Eligible Medicare Members

Utah health plan to use Synergy Targeted Population Management® to boost care management for vulnerable members, including seniors eligible for Medicaid and Medicare.

TAMPA, Fla., July 26, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Molina Healthcare of Utah, a Molina-licensed health plan based in Utah that provides high-quality health care coverage to more than 80,000 financially vulnerable residents, has partnered with Health Integrated, Inc., a leading health management solutions provider, to offer its members enhanced health coaching services.

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Molina will use Health Integrated's Synergy Targeted Population Management program ("Synergy") to help manage the care of its Medicaid and dual-eligible Medicaid/Medicare members who suffer from chronic conditions, such as diabetes, congestive heart failure and asthma, and have co-morbid behavioral health conditions, such as depression, anxiety or other psychosocial factors that negatively affect their physical health.

"In these difficult times when states are struggling to pay for ever increasing Medicaid costs, different strategies must be implemented to enhance the quality and outcomes of the health care provided to their most financially vulnerable members," says Richard Sanchez, MD, chief medical officer of Molina of Utah Healthcare. "Through our partnership with Health Integrated, our 6,500 Special Needs Plan members and our 65,000 Medicaid members will now be able to leverage a unique whole-person approach to care management that has been proven to improve quality of life measures and reducing healthcare costs."

Molina will seamlessly integrate Synergy, which includes access to specially trained care coaches who help individuals understand and adhere to their physician's treatment plan, into its existing care offerings at no additional cost to its members. Program participants work with their dedicated care coach and receive guidance, support and actionable need-specific strategies.

"Across the country, there is a steady rise in enrollment into Special Needs Plans – plans that reach members who qualify for both Medicaid and Medicare because they are financially vulnerable and are senior citizens. These members suffer disproportionately from multiple chronic and psychosocial factors that worsen physical symptoms and disease progression," says Sam Toney, MD, vice chairman and chief medical officer of Health Integrated.

About Molina Healthcare

Molina Healthcare, Inc. provides quality and cost-effective Medicaid-related solutions to meet the health care needs of low-income families and individuals and to assist state agencies in their administration of the Medicaid program.  Our licensed health plans in California, Florida, Michigan, Missouri, New Mexico, Ohio, Texas, Utah, and Washington currently serve approximately 1.6 million members, and our subsidiary, Molina Medicaid Solutions, provides business processing and information technology administrative services to Medicaid agencies in Idaho, Louisiana, Maine, New Jersey, and West Virginia, and drug rebate administration services in Florida.  More information about Molina Healthcare is available at www.molinahealthcare.com.

About Health Integrated

Health Integrated is the leading innovation partner for health plans, providing evidence-based solutions to accelerate achievement of health management goals for clinical outcomes, quality measures and cost containment. For more information, visit www.healthintegrated.com.

Media Contact
Sue Dudzik Janczak
813-388-4040 or [email protected]

SOURCE Health Integrated, Inc.

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