Income, Poverty and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2011

WASHINGTON, Sept. 12, 2012 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The U.S. Census Bureau announced today that in 2011, median household income declined, the poverty rate was not statistically different from the previous year and the percentage of people without health insurance coverage decreased.

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Real median household income in the United States in 2011 was $50,054, a 1.5 percent decline from the 2010 median and the second consecutive annual drop.

The nation's official poverty rate in 2011 was 15.0 percent, with 46.2 million people in poverty. After three consecutive years of increases, neither the poverty rate nor the number of people in poverty were statistically different from the 2010 estimates.

The number of people without health insurance coverage declined from 50.0 million in 2010 to 48.6 million in 2011, as did the percentage without coverage – from 16.3 percent in 2010 to 15.7 percent in 2011.

These findings are contained in the report Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2011. The following results for the nation were compiled from information collected in the 2012 Current Population Survey (CPS) Annual Social and Economic Supplement (ASEC):

View the full news release online for more findings on income, poverty and health insurance and for information about the upcoming Supplemental Poverty Measure and state and local estimates from the American Community Survey.

Media kit

Report

Income data

Poverty data

Health insurance coverage data

Spanish Version

Contact:
Public Information Office
301-763-3030
e-mail: [email protected]

SOURCE U.S. Census Bureau

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