Employees sue Anthem over 401(k) complaints; Slow start to flu season is good news for health insurers;

News From Around the Web

> Pennsylvania-based Capital BlueCross is teaming up with The Leapfrog Group to create a regional hospital recognition program to better steer consumers to high-quality care, the Central Penn Business Journal reports. Article

> In a lawsuit filed against Anthem, employees and retirees say the company forced them to pay exorbitant fees for a Vanguard Group 401(k) program, though the funds were billed as low-cost options, the Indianapolis Business Journal reports. Article

> A slow start to the flu season in the United States spurred by the unusually warm winter is boosting health insurers' bottom lines, BloombergBusiness reports. Article

> Following an investigation that found the insurance provider engaged in anti-competitive practices involving elder and long-term care products, UnitedHealth Group has been ordered by the New York Attorney General to pay a $100,000 fine. The settlement centers on efforts made by UnitedHealth that forced nursing homes to purchase unwanted insurance services in order to participate in the insurance carrier's broader network, Reuters reports. Article

Health IT News

> Men working in the healthcare technology field make about $26,000 more than women, with the average salary for such professionals at $111,000, the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society's 2015 Compensation Survey found. Article

Practice Management News

> With a small window of time before the U.S. presidential elections take all the legislative air out of the room, medical advocacy groups are focused on advancing their top priorities. The majority of this year's goals lies in the regulatory arena, according to a story in MedPage Today. Article

And finally… Would this count as an unattended bag? Article

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