Arbitrators rule Highmark must pay UMPC for past cancer care claims; Fiorina takes aim at drug companies, health insurers;

News from Around the Web

> An arbitration panel has ruled that Highmark Inc. violated a contract with University of Pittsburgh Medical Center for overpayments for chemotherapy. As a result, the health insurer must pay at least $24 million, and perhaps $188 million, for past cancer patient claims, according to the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Article

> Former Hewlett-Packard CEO Carly Fiorina became the latest Republican candidate to blame the drug industry and health insurers for rising healthcare prices, citing lack of transparency in their business practices, according to The Hill. Article

> Nathan Fields makes the rounds of Baltimore's red light district every Thursday night, and the outreach worker talks with the dancers, bouncers and walkers on "The Block" about how to prevent drug overdoses and how to stop the spread of various sexually transmitted diseases. Fields, who works for the Baltimore City Health Department, provides those he meets with healthcare information and acts as a liaison between the public and the department, according to NPR. Article

AntiFraud News

> Medicare should take the same approach to fraudulent medical claims as credit card companies take to questionable charges, according to attorney Hank B. Walther, former chief of the Health Care Fraud Unit in the Department of Justice's criminal division. Article

Healthcare News

> A judge just ruled that a hospital is not liable for an employee Facebook post which contained a screenshot of a patient's medical record that revealed she had a sexually transmitted infection. The hospital was not found liable for the privacy violation because the employee went outside the scope of her employment when accessing the information. Article

And finally… The greatest debate question has finally been answered: The hotdog is not a sandwich. Article

Suggested Articles

States want to try value-based payment models for drug costs, but there are plenty of barriers to implementation, according to a new report.

At least six states are creating their own health insurance marketplaces or seriously considering doing so.

Automating prior auth can improve payer-provider interactions. Learn the best tools for automation and how they can reduce provider abrasion.