AHIP critical of presidential candidates' plans to curb drug costs

America's Health Insurance Plans (AHIP) does not appear to be impressed with certain elements of presidential candidates' plans to combat the rising cost of prescription drugs.

Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton unveiled her plan Tuesday to reduce the pressure on consumers, calling for caps on monthly and annual out-of-pocket costs for prescription drugs for patients with chronic illnesses. 

In its statement about the candidates' recent plans, AHIP is critical of any plan "that would impose arbitrary caps on insurance coverage or force government negotiation on prescription drug prices," saying that such policies "will only add to the cost pressures facing individuals and families across the country."

Bernie Sanders, the other Democratic candidate, debuted a plan before Clinton's that calls for Medicare to negotiate drug prices.

His plan also calls for major disclosures from drugmakers about what it costs to produce medications and the prices they charge and profits they yield for the same drug in other countries.

For its part, AHIP seems to support Sanders' push for disclosures.

"We strongly believe that greater transparency around drug pricing and more competition in the market are critical to support sustainable, private-sector solutions that deliver the best value for patients and the health system," the group's statement says.

AHIP's suggestions to promote drug affordability, meanwhile, include removing state-level barriers that restrict the use of biosimilars, prohibiting drug companies' "abuse of the patent process," and encouraging alternative payment structures for new drugs and technology.

To learn more:
- here's AHIP's statement

Suggested Articles

Medicare Advantage open enrollment kicked off last week, and insurers are taking new approaches to marketing a slate of supplemental benefit options. 

Centene announced another five states have approved its pending $17B merger with WellCare, bringing total number of approvals to 24.

Group Health Cooperative in Seattle is accused of bilking Medicare out of millions of dollars in a federal whistleblower case.