Aetna seeks consumer dialogue about wellness

The reform law is driving insurers to implement a more consumer-focused approach in their marketing and outreach campaigns, says a senior marketing executive for Aetna.

That's why the insurer launched a campaign this summer called "What's Your Healthy?" that aims to reach out to a "broader universe of consumers who know the brand but have never experienced Aetna products," Robert Mead, Aetna's senior vice president of marketing and communications, said in an interview with Forbes.

Aetna launched "What's Your Healthy?" in June, using a mobile platform that combines its own mobile apps with third-party, consumer-facing apps, FierceMobileHealthcare previously reported.

The campaign is part of Aetna's overall rebranding, which it started last year with a new logo and a heightened consumer focus.

"We wanted to start a new dialogue, not only with our own members but with consumers at large, about the fact that we understand that everybody's definition of healthy is different," he said.

The marketing campaign includes TV ads, but its primary focus is the What's Your Healthy digital hub, where consumers can create profiles and answer questions and share their definitions of healthy.

"Then we can help them achieve that healthy and get there. You hear a lot about 'we don't have a good healthcare system or a sick care system,'" Mead said. "It's not only about healthcare and hospitals and doctors and tests and procedures, it's about wellness, it's about physical, mental and spiritual wellness."

The next phase of the promotion, which Aetna intends to be a long-term branding platform, will include information about wellness and nutritional counseling from both in-house and outside experts, Mead added.

To learn more:
- read the Forbes article

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