Aetna brings Whole Health plans to Atlanta in partnership with Emory, Northside

Aetna sign
Aetna is growing its Whole Health plans to Atlanta. (Wonderlane, CC BY 2.0)

Aetna is partnering with Emory Healthcare and Northside Hospital System to bring its Whole Health program to the Atlanta market. 

The value-based approach is designed to reward doctors who improve patient quality and drive down unnecessary costs associated with waste and poor coordination, Aetna said in an announcement. The model is centered on primary care. 

Whole Health will offer both self-insured and fully insured HMO and EPO coverage with access to 900 primary care docs, 3,500 specialists, 14 hospitals and 500 outpatient centers across the region, according to Aetna. 

“Over the past two years, we worked diligently to improve both the experience and cost structure for our members in the market,” Frank Ulibarri, Aetna’s president in Georgia, said in a statement. “The result is a product that truly acts as a bridge, allowing more coordinated and accessible healthcare options, designed to lead to better outcomes.” 

RELATED: Ex-Aetna CEO Bertolini to depart CVS' board 

Aetna offers Whole Health plans in a variety of markets across the country. A unique quirk of the Atlanta launch, however, is direct integration with CVS HealthHUB stores, the insurer said. 

CVS Health, Aetna’s parent company, has put a lot of effort behind its expansion of HealthHUBs across the country, with the goal of reaching 1,500 such stores nationwide by the end of 2021. The stores allocate 20% of retail space to health services. 

CVS currently operates 16 HealthHUBs in the Atlanta area and is planning to open 15 to 20 more over the course of this year. 

Jonathan Lewin, M.D., Emory’s CEO, said the health system is pleased to have the opportunity collaborate with Aetna on the plans. 

“Providing healthcare options will allow local residents to choose the most appropriate plan for themselves and their families with a continued focus on excellent in quality, care delivery and outcomes,” Lewin said in a statement. 

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