Watch users claim Apple wearable improves health

Nearly two-thirds of Apple Watch users are exercising more often and for longer periods of time, and 72 percent claim the wearable is improving their health and fitness levels, according to a new report.

The survey, conducted by Wristly, involves 1,500 Watch wearers, and notes that more than half, 58 percent, had never used any wearable activity tracker previously. Roughly 65 percent of Watch users consider themselves new to using activity and fitness wearable technology, according to the report.

The survey also reports that three-fourths of those polled are tapping the Watch's built-in apps, while 13 percent have used a third-party app on the wristband. 

"Apple Watch owners have already gone beyond being aware to beginning to reap the benefits of a more active lifestyle," the report notes. "In aggregate, 83 percent are reporting 'some' [59 percent] to 'a lot' [24 percent] of changes since wearing the Watch as it relates to their overall fitness and health."

One of the most cited Watch activity features is the "stand up" alert reminder that pops up every 50 minutes to spur the user to get moving. Seventy-four percent of those polled say they are standing more and being more active due to the alert. Just 9 percent said they were inclined to turn off the alert.

Despite the obvious benefits being gained by Watch users, some industry watchers are a bit more cautious regarding the device's impact on the wearables landscape. David Lee Scher, M.D., says the Watch has not yet proven itself to be the game changer many are saying it will be, though he believes such digital tech will have a huge impact healthcare.

For more information:
- download the report (.pdf)

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