Verizon, Duke team up on telehealth, mobile engagement

Verizon and Duke University will be working together for the next few years on a variety of mHealth projects, including telehealth, mobile patient engagement and remote patient monitoring.

The project will put Verizon's networking, infrastructure and marketing tools in the hands of Duke students, and even bring students into Verizon to work alongside their professional counterparts. It also will bring reps from both organizations together onto a scientific advisory board to assess new mHealth technologies and opportunities, Verizon officials tell InformationWeek Healthcare.

There's a potentially huge payoff for both: Duke students get a massive marketing machine to plug their emerging products, and business support to scale their pilot projects for mass distribution. Verizon, meanwhile, gains access to up-to-the-minute new technologies being developed at Duke's Health Sector Management Program.

"Leveraging Duke's renowned research capabilities will help Verizon's technical staff identify and deploy technologies that are needed to advance U.S. health care," Peter Tippett, Verizon's vice president of connected healthcare solutions, said in a statement.

First on the runway may be a telehealth app that would allow clinicians to connect with patients via smartphone and determine if they need an in-person visit, InformationWeek reports. Also on the drawing board are remote patient monitoring and remote sensor systems that can record and transmit patient data to providers.

To learn more:
- read the InformationWeek Healthcare story
- check out Verizon's press release
- get more detail from MedCity News' coverage

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