Teens turn to smartphones for sex education; Business investor turned off by mobile apps;

> Teens increasingly are turning to mobile apps for sexual understanding and information, according to a story at ENews Park Forest. In fact, more than 40 percent of teens in a recent study report seeking sexual information via their mobile phones. As a result, a growing number of organizations are creating sexual-health-related apps and tools. Check out just a few. Article

> The iPad 2's retina display rivals high-end dental imaging via LCD monitors, according to a recent study. It's still recommended only as an adjunct viewer, due to its ability only to adjust brightness, but not contrast--but the study finds it's a valuable tool for dentists working outside the office. Article

> Not everyone is on the mHealth bandwagon. One healthcare venture investor tells MedCity News that mobile apps aren't at the top of her agenda. She calls healthcare apps "narrow applications with short life cycles," and questions whether they'll ever be able to have a sustainable business model. Article

> A California Veterans Affairs hospital has created a new PTSD app for veterans, this one involving the vets' friends and family in both diagnosing and tracking the patient's condition and progress. The app asks diagnostic questions to help vets determine if they're suffering from the condition, and also provides multiple assessments for family and friends to determine the level of anxiety, and progress of symptoms. Article

And Finally... The original global warming. Article

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