Seniors get connected, take control of their health

Even elderly patients are changing long-held beliefs that doctors know best, and remote telemonitoring is the reason why, according to the Center for Connected Health at Partners HealthCare System in Boston. Writing on the Connected Health blog, Kathy Duckett, director of clinical programs at Partners Home Care, describes how seniors have harnessed this 21st-century means of biofeedback to stop riding the "Chronic Disease Bus" that takes them in and out of hospitals, and start "taking the wheel" of their own health journey.

"I've rarely had a patient say, 'No one ever told me that I should decrease my salt,' or 'limit my fluids' or 'take my water pill.' They all know what they are supposed to do," writes Duckett, a registered nurse. "What telemonitoring does is make them clearly understand why.

"It helps them make connections they never made before so they can have the 'aha' moment, connecting the hot dog they had while watching the Red Sox game to the four-pound weight gain they have the next morning, or that bagel with cream cheese and caramel latte with their 350 blood sugar," Duckett explains.

For more on telemonitoring programs at Partners:
- read Duckett's blog post

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