Report: Smartphone owners see devices changing how they manage their health

More than one third of adult smartphone owners claim they are healthier due to their devices and use of subsequent apps, and the health and wellness industry may be the next digital frontier, according to a new report from San Jose, California-based Apigee.

The survey, regarding the digital impact on various industries and consumer segments, polled 1,000 smartphone owners ages 18 and older.

"This year's survey suggests that smartphones and apps are beginning to dramatically impact the way we manage our health--from wearables that measure fitness to health apps from our doctors," Chet Kapoor, Apigee CEO, said in an announcement.

Of those polled, 86 percent claim smartphones allow them more control over their lives. About half, 49 percent, want their physicians to use data collected from a fitness tracker and health apps, and 80 percent expect doctors will offer key functionality via smartphone apps within the next two years. 

Use of a tethered mobile personal health record system can spur patient empowerment with regard to treatment, boost communication between patients and caregivers, reduce medical errors and improve safety, according to research published in October in Telemedicine and e-Health

AirStrip CEO Alan Portela previously told FierceMobileHealthcare that 2016 will be a year in which sophisticated communication and coordination tools, including smartphones, will revolutionize care delivery.

The Apigee survey predicts within the next two years, smartphones and apps will impact health and wellness management as much as smartphones the more "digitally mature" banking and retail industries.

For more information:
- read the announcement

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