One-fourth of Americans trust mHealth apps as much as their doctors

A quarter of Americans trust symptom checker websites, symptom check mobile apps or home-based vital sign monitors as much as they do their doctors, according to a recent U.S. survey commissioned by Royal Philips Electronics. In addition, about an equal proportion (26 percent) often use these resources instead of going to the doctor.

The survey was taken from a national sample of 1,003 adults, comprising of 503 men and 500 women ages 18 years and older, living in the continental United States. More than a third (35 percent) of those surveyed believe technology that allows one to monitor their own health is now the key to living a long life.

Around half of those surveyed are comfortable using symptom checker mobile apps or home-based vital sign monitors that automatically share information with their doctor. Announcement

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