NASA developed smartphone attachment could help diagnose diabetes, cancer; App helps nurses decode medical abbreviations;

> Nanosensor technology for smartphones that has been used to monitor air quality and to check for fuel leaks around vehicles soon could be used to diagnose and monitor people with diabetes or cancer, Gizmodo recently reported. The technology is being developed by NASA, and requires that users simply breathe onto an attachment. Article

> Secure mobile messaging firm TigerText just won $8.2 million in funding to accelerate development of its HIPAA-compliant messaging platform used by providers. The company previously closed $2.2 million of seed financing in 2010. Announcement

> A nurse at Beth Israel Hospital in New York created a free app--Nurse Net--that decodes more than 10,000 medical abbreviations used on medical charts, the New York Daily News reports. Article

And Finally... I suppose it was worth a roll of the dice. Article

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