Medical image sharing for patients enabled by new MIM app

MIM's new VueMe appMIM Software, makers of MIM Mobile, the industry's first FDA-approved radiology viewing app, have turned their attention from physician users to patients.

While MIM Mobile mainly was created for radiologists and physicians, a new app, VueMe, is an extension that allows patients to access MIM Mobile images on their smartphones, company officials say. MIM also created MIMcloud 2.0, a cloud-based service that stores the images, and allows patients to share them with family, specialists and others on mobile devices.

"Instead of a patient having to take a manilla folder or CD with radiology results--they can use a cloud service to store their images, and beam them to other specialists who might not have immediate access to their medical imaging," writes Iltifat Husain in iMedicalApps.

The images can be shared directly, as well, bypassing the cloud option, officials say. Patients can send images from their smartphones to any iPad, iPod or iPhone enabled with the MIM Mobile or VueMe apps.
Husain projects the MIMcloud 2.0 will be the preferred method, over time, though, and not just for radiology images.

"Clearly, cloud storage of not only radiology images, but patient records, is, and should be the future," Husain says. "If Mobile MIM and VueMe can continue to gain significant mind share, patient records stored in a universal cloud, and not EHR silos, should be the next logical step forward."

Two minor, but potentially problematic issues:

1) It appears patients may have to upload their own imaging files. "Patients have the right to request copies of their X-rays and other scans on a CD. The DICOM files can then be easily uploaded and transmitted to an iPad, iPhone, or iPod touch using the free MIMcloud software," company officials say in a press release.

2) The app is free, but the imaging storage isn't. The first three imaging uploads are free, but subsequent uploads cost $1 each. It may seem a low-cost option, but could add up over time.

The app is available for free through iTunes.

To learn more:
- read the MIM press release
- check out iMedical Apps' coverage

Suggested Articles

The newly launched Center for Connected Health will be largest telehealth hub in the Philadelphia region, according to Penn Medicine.

The FDA commissioner wants to use additional funding under Trump's budget to advance digital health initiatives and integrate real-world data.

The FDA's approval of an app that uses AI to notify specialists of a potential stroke offers new possibilities for triage software that uses CDS.