iPhone, iPad mHealth technologies in line for huge investment coup

mHealth firms took both top prizes in the healthcare IT investment competition, DC-to-VC, organized by Morgenthaler Ventures. The winners included an iPhone app to diagnose basic eye conditions and a tablet platform that enables doctors to communicate with and educate patients.

The winner in the "seed" category was EyeNetra, an iPhone clip-on/app combination that allows even non-clinicians to conduct basic tests for cataracts, astigmatism, near-sightedness and other eye conditions, according to TechCrunch. It's ultimate focus is to deliver eye diagnostics globally, particularly into developing nations with little optometric infrastructure.

Jiff took the top spot in the "series A" category of companies. The iPad platform allows physicians to play instructional videos for patients, and email the video files to patients for later viewing--using the device in place of a wall chart or poster. According to The Health Care Blog, the devices' slick presentation received the highest ratings of all the contest entrants.

Other finalists include a raft of mHealth contenders:

  • Careticker: A platform that allows patients to do advance planning and paperwork for hospital procedures.
  • Skimble: A multi-faceted mobile wellness platform of apps.
  • SurgiChart: A mobile-enabled social network that physicians can use to discuss clinical issues with colleagues.
  • TeleThrive: A doc-on-demand telehealth service providing audio or video consults.
  • YourNurseIsOn.com: Provides secure text, phone and email communication management for hospitals.

The competition didn't award cash directly, but winners and finalists alike are expected to find VC or angel investors in short order.

To learn more:
- read the TechCrunch article
- check out The Health Care Blog's commentary
- read about the DC-to-VC competition at HealthTech Capital

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