Healthcare is No. 3 sector for iPad adoption

Healthcare is one of the top three industries using Apple's hot-selling iPad tablet, behind only the financial and technology sectors, according to data from mobility service provider Good Technology.

"We took a close look at our customers who have deployed iPad devices so far," John Herrema, senior vice president of corporate strategy at Redwood City, Calif.-based Good Technology, Healthcare IT News reports. "We found that the financial services sector dominated, accounting for 36 percent of Good's iPad activations to date. The technology sector came in second at 11 percent, followed closely by healthcare at 10 percent. We believe these industries are embracing the iPad because its unique design makes it easier to perform time-sensitive, mission-critical tasks."

In many cases, hospitals have embraced the iPad because other mobile devices aren't the right size, are too heavy or don't have the battery life of Apple's product, says Nick Volosin Kaweah Delta Health Care District in Visalia, Calif. According to Healthcare IT News, the hospital's emergency department could trade in one $7,500 computer on wheels (COW) for three iPads, which cost a total of about $1,500.

FierceMobileHealthcare reported earlier this year that Kaweah Delta Health Care District was issuing 100 iPads to various healthcare workers. According to Healthcare IT News, the company is considering marrying iPads with barcode readers to help in medication administration. The district also is looking at how iPads can help in pharmacy, dietary, home health, biomedical and hospice services, as well as with nurse supervisors and private-practice physicians.

For additional information:
- take a look at this Healthcare IT News story

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