Google Glass app puts medical health records on the move

A new Google Glass application being cited as the first wearable health record enables medical staff to record patient consultations and surgeries with patient consent, according to a Reuters report.

The free app, developed by electronic medical record vendor Drchrono, is just the latest technology to come to Glass. Drchrono, according to the article, worked in collaboration with cloud-based storage vendor Box on capabilities that allow for photo, note and video storage that can be shared on demand.

"Google is still in the early-stages of determining the most viable use-cases for Google Glass," Drchrono co-founder Daniel Kivatinos told Reuters. "But some doctors are demanding Glass, so Google is providing resources and support to developers."

As FierceMobileHealthcare has reported, one of the early Glass adopters is Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center's emergency department. A pilot at the Boston hospital has proven so successful that it is moving toward a full deployment.

Glass is just one part of Google's mHealth strategy. Recently, reports have surfaced that Google plans to launch a health platform called Google Fit that will aggregate data from fitness-tracking devices and health-related apps. What's more, in April a report revealed the search titan may be making a contact lens featuring a computerized camera along with a sensor and an integrated, thin silicon chip.

Currently, 60,000 physicians are using Drchono's EMR system, according to Reuters, and 300 of which are now using the app.

For more information:
- read the Reuters article

Related Articles:
Google plans rival to Apple's HealthKit
Patent filing reveals Google may be developing a contact lens camera
Google gives a sneak peek at its mHealth intentions
90 million wearable devices to ship in 2014
Beth Israel Deaconess Google Glass pilot set to expand

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