Continua, Global Certification Forum partner to test mobile health devices

Is the mobile healthcare industry looking to head the FDA off at the pass? Might be. 

Two major mobile technology advocacy groups, Global Certification Forum and Continua Health Alliance, partnered this week to create testing and certification standards for wireless "personal connected health solutions." Their goal: To assure the interoperability of wireless devices like glucose monitors and scales, as well as services like personal health records, wellness reminders and other apps provided via smartphones.

The groups say they will create a standard set of tests that ensure devices are plug and play, and can work on a variety of networks or platforms. The move may help push new products and services to market faster, says Continua executive director Chuck Parker.

"By developing an effective process for testing these systems, we're expanding the ability of our members to deliver compelling products to consumers and healthcare providers," he adds.

Continua is a well-known player in the mobile health world, but GCF is a relative newcomer, having made its name testing mobile devices in nonhealthcare markets. The nonprofit group conducts a variety of conformance tests on mobile units, including field trials, to ensure they can operate across multiple platforms, such as the iPhone or Windows Phone 7. GCF has 220-plus members from the mobile networking, manufacture and service industries, including heavyweights like AT&T, Verizon, Samsung, Nokia and others. 

To learn more:
- read this Global Certification Forum press release
- check out this Health Data Management brief
- here's an IntoMobile post from September

Related Content:
Continua Health Alliance Expands Global Impact Through Support of European Initiatives
Continua-certified mobile phone presents re-branding opportunity for failed PHRs

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