6 reasons mHealth apps fail to deliver on promises

Lack of specific healthcare knowledge and ignorance on required privacy protection for data are among the top reasons many mHealth apps fail to deliver on promises, according to a new white paper from London-based testing and certification company Intertek.

Among other reasons listed for mHealth app failures:

  • Scarce in-app security measures
  • Little security testing
  • Weak and improper policies
  • Shaggy unstable user interfaces

The fail points likely will only expand as mHealth apps, devices and platform proliferate.

"Now is the time to address issues in development and implementations," the white paper states. "By knowing potential pitfalls, what to watch out for, and what to pay closer attention to, mHealth app development and traditional device companies can create more robust, more useful products that will help give users the health experience they want and help give their businesses a brighter future."

The assessment comes at a time of big growth in mHealth, as smartphones morph into diagnostic tools, state health agencies build apps for Medicaid consumers and federal regulators begin to approve software for health and fitness tracking needs. 

As FierceMobileHealthcare reported in late January, the first set of mobile apps for diabetics looking to share data collected by continuous glucose monitors received a green light from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. A recent ARC 360 report notes the key element to mHealth app success lies with listening to users and providing needed, useful tools, notes the report, which recommends developers engage with an intended user base as early as possible and monitor ongoing customer feedback.

According to the Intek white paper, there's no time to waste in addressing the issues and challenges in mHealth app development and implementation.

"By knowing potential pitfalls, what to watch out for, and what to pay closer attention to, mHealth app development and traditional device companies can create more robust, more useful products that will help give users the health experience they want and help give their businesses a brighter future," the report states.

For more information:
- read the white paper

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