Isabel, BMJ tool offers enhanced diagnosis decision support

Isabel Healthcare and BMJ Group have joined forces to create a new decision support tool for physicians. The application, known as Isabel with Best Practice, integrates Isabel's diagnosis decision aid--which emphasizes rare conditions that physicians often overlook--with BMJ Best Practice's evidence-based disease monographs.

When clinicians enter a patient's signs and symptoms, Isabel with Best Practice generates a checklist of potential diagnoses. After doctors select a diagnosis, they go into the Best Practice monographs. Those monographs provide information on other important symptoms, as well as first and second line tests, to help pinpoint the diagnosis. Treatment guidelines also are provided.

BMJ Best Practice, which incorporates the reviews of Clinical Evidence, summarizes the most relevant evidence from the medical literature, adding guidelines and expert opinion to help guide diagnosis and treatment. Isabel Healthcare, founded in 2000 by Jason Maude, is named after Maude's daughter, who almost died after a potentially fatal illness was not recognized. The company says its decision support system is used by "thousands" of clinicians worldwide.

Isabel with Best Practice is the only diagnosis decision support tool exclusively endorsed by BMJ Group, according to the announcement. It is also claimed to be the only solution of its type that fully integrates with electronic health records.

"Isabel with Best Practice ushers in the next generation of decision support affording faster and more accurate decisions," stated Dr. Rubin Minhas, clinical director for BMJ Evidence Centre, a global provider of evidence-based decision support to healthcare professionals. "For the first time, all the key information and decision tools are included in one system, saving the clinician valuable time at the point of care."

To learn more:
- read the press release
- see the Isabel with Best Practice site
- check out the BMJ Best Practice site

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