Health tech, data will lead to 'Internet of Me'

Health research, data and computing power will lead to the "Internet of Me," according to Adriana Karaboutis, executive vice president of technology at Biogen.

This will lead to more effective treatments that are personalized for each patient, she said at the InformationWeek Conference at Interop, according to an article at InformationWeek.

Even the government is getting involved in personalized medicine and treatments. In late January, President Barack Obama announced his Precision Medicine Initiative, which aims to increase the use of personalized information in healthcare.

"I want the country that eliminated polio and mapped the human genome to lead a new era of medicine--one that delivers the right treatment at the right time," Obama said in the announcement.

The key to creating such care is personal patient data that can be collected and analyzed--and connected technology is greatly increasing the ability to do so, Karaboutis said. "Healthcare is changing," she said. "It's no longer about treating symptoms. It's about outcomes."

For organizations to support such goals, their IT departments must understand how the culture of technology and science differs, she said. Regulations, practices and culture, and not just technology, all have to be involved in innovation, Karaboutis said.

IBM is jumping on the personalized medicine bandwagon as well, having recently announced plans to collaborate with 14 cancer institutes across the country to create more personalized treatments for patients.

To learn more:
- here's the InformationWeek article

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