GE and Startup Health announce inaugural class for entrepreneurship program; Ex-VA CIO Baker lands with Agilex Technologies;

News From Around the Web

> GE and Startup Health this week announced the 13 startups selected to participate in their inaugural entrepreneurship program, GigaOM reports. The program provides mentorship, training and other support for the selected companies in exchange for giving up anywhere from two to 10 percent equity ownership. The 13 companies selected were whittled down from more than 400 applicants. Article

> Former U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs CIO Roger Baker this week was named chief strategy officer for Agilex Technologies, a Chantilly, Va.-based IT services firm, according to the Federal Times. Baker had served at the VA for four years prior to announcing his resignation in February. Post

Provider News

> Hospital CEOs are struggling to bridge the gap between fee-for-service and value-based care, according to Huron Healthcare's third annual CEO forum. Despite growing pressure for hospitals to deliver higher quality, more patient-centered care, the fee-for-service model isn't dead yet--putting CEOs in the tough spot of continuing current fee-for-service reimbursement while simultaneously moving toward payment reform. Article

> Republican lawmakers on Wednesday updated their plan to repeal Medicare's sustainable growth rate (SGR) formula and replace it with efforts to reward providers for delivering high-value, efficient care. Based on stakeholder input, the second draft includes a period of stable payment updates and applies evidence- and specialty-based measures to determine quality and efficiency. Post

And Finally… Hard to believe we've gone more than a century without a beard in the White House. Article

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