Healthcare Roundup—One Medical CEO says primary care plan will cut costs by 10%; IU Health drops tattoo ban

Indiana University Health announced it would allow employees to sport non-natural hair color and visible ink, a move which officials said was meant to reflect the health system's message of authenticity. (Getty/PatrikSlezak)

One Medical CEO: $350M investment to cut healthcare costs by 10%

A $350 million investment from private equity firm Carlyle Group will allow the concierge primary care organization to double its office space, expand its membership and aggressively hire more providers, officials said last week.

Looking at the big picture, One Medical CEO Amir Rubin said he believes his company's model could ultimately cut all U.S. healthcare costs by 10%, CNBC reported. The group, backed by Alphabet's Google Ventures, has 72 offices. (CNBC)

Tattoo rules relax at Indiana University Health

Indiana University Health announced it would allow employees to sport non-natural hair color and visible ink, a move officials said was meant to reflect the health system's message of authenticity.

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"We knew that many of our caregivers had tattoos that they were hiding and that just didn’t feel genuine to us," Michelle Janney, chief nurse executive of IU Health told the Indianapolis Star. “Actually what we’re saying is use good judgment and we trust you.”

It is part of a broader shift in healthcare and other industries as the popularity of tattoos has soared in recent years. Earlier this year, Mayo Clinic also changed its employee tattoo policy. (Indianapolis Star)

Senior health IT official Genevieve Morris resigns from her positions at ONC, VA

Genevieve Morris, who served as the principal deputy national coordinator for health IT at ONC, announced her resignation on Twitter Friday following media reports that she had stepped down from her position leading the VA's Office of Electronic Health Record Modernization as the acting chief health information officer. She was appointed to the VA position on July 12. (FierceHealthIT)

ProMedica Health System plans layoff of 100 people

A month after announcing a joint venture with skilled nursing facility operator HCA Manor Care, Ohio-based ProMedica Health System says it will lay off 100 workers and leave 60 additional positions unfilled.

The announcement came almost exactly a month after the joint venture was finalized, making ProMedica the 15th-large healthcare system in the country with $7 billion in revenue.

Many of the jobs which will be lost include leadership roles and corporate functions. Officials said none of the cut positions are at HCR ManorCare. (McKnight's Senior Living)

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