Healthcare Roundup—Minnesota AG sues insulin makers; Mississippi hospital to split from MA

Minnesota's attorney general filed suit against three insulin makers, alleging price gouging of diabetics. (Getty/3283197d_273)

Minnesota Attorney General files lawsuit against insulin makers

Minnesota Attorney General Lori Swanson filed suit this week against three insulin makers, alleging price-gouging of diabetic patients who depend on the medication.

The price of insulin has tripled even though it has not fundamentally changed, Swanson said. She alleges the companies schemed to raise the prices. Companies named in the suit, including Eli Lilly and Novo Nordisk, told the news organization they would defend against the allegations and said follow legal and regulatory requirements. (Star Tribune)

Mississippi hospital to split from Medicare Advantage contract

North Mississippi Health Services gave notice it plans to terminate its provider network agreement with Humana Medicare Advantage plans next year, citing high numbers of improper denials, the Daily Journal reported.

The termination is expected to impact about 4,500 people who have the plans and utilize the health system, officials said. MA is a managed care option for Medicare recipients that offers certain services beyond traditional Medicare such as dental, hearing and vision coverage, within its network. (Daily Journal)

Majority of doctors say MOC requirements don't add clinical value, survey finds

Poll: Informal caregivers experience major cost, health burdens

Friends and family who take on the responsibility of being caregivers for their loved ones are shouldering substantial health and personal costs, according to a new study from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

About 1 in 4 informal caregivers spend the equivalent of a full-time job taking care of their loved one and 80% pay for caregiving costs out of their own pockets, with 13% spending $500 or more a month. Nearly 40% of caregivers have a health concern that affects their daily life or limits their own activities and 40% of this group said that providing care makes it harder to manage their own health. (Release)

Suggested Articles

There could be imminent shortages of antimalarial drugs and antibiotics that are critical to providing care for COVID-19 patients.

The Trump administration gave guidance for providers on how to split ventilators to be used on two patients at once as demand swells due to COVID-19

HCA Healthcare's CEO announced he will donate pay for the next two months to an employee assistance fund as the system has to cut hours.