Healthcare Roundup—California hospital accused of secretly filming women giving birth

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A lawsuit filed in southern California alleges a women's hospital secretly recorded about 1,800 patients in labor and delivery rooms using hidden cameras. (Matthew Henry/Burst)

California hospital accused of secretly filming women giving birth

A lawsuit filed in southern California alleges a women's hospital secretly recorded about 1,800 patients in labor and delivery rooms using hidden cameras, CNN reported.

The recording allegedly occurred at Sharp Grossmont Hospital in La Mesa in 2012. The videos were not stored or discarded in a secure manner, the suit alleges. Women learned about the recordings by a third-party administrator, CNN reported. 

According to a legal document prepared by the hospital in a medical board case against a doctor, the hospital installed cameras on carts in the labor and delivery rooms to identify the source of suspected drug thefts. (CNN)

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Western Maryland Health System pursues UPMC affiliation

Western Maryland Health System signed a non-binding letter of intent to integrate into the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) system. 

The affiliation would offer Allegany County Maryland enhanced access to healthcare services and allow the system improved ability to recruit more top doctors to the area. (Release)

Florida lawmakers examining certificate of need law changes

A bill passed in the Florida House to eliminate rules around where hospitals can build or add beds is under consideration in the Florida Senate, the Tampa Bay Times reported. 

Florida is one of about 40 states with certificate of need, or CON, laws that require regulatory approval for major capital projects. 

Those seeking to get rid of the CON process say it hurts competition and allows existing facilities to raise costs while those who want to keep CON say it is needed to ensure high volumes of cases keep providers well-trained to deliver complex treatments and make high-cost investments worthwhile. (Tampa Bay Times)

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