Video Game Addiction: Help is on the Way

BIRMINGHAM, Mich., April 28 /PRNewswire/ -- Kevin Roberts, a Michigan educator who specializes in Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) and learning issues, is now conducting support groups for teens and adults who struggle with video game addiction. Roberts, himself a recovering video game addict, leads weekly groups which emphasize staying "sober," setting goals and developing healthy behaviors.

Roberts' meetings combine elements of 12-step groups, like Alcoholics Anonymous, with personal growth processes that stress accountability and responsibility.

Roberts encourages group members to support each other. "If you have an intense craving to play a game," he tells his groups, "pick up the phone and call someone." Roberts blames previous relapses in his own recovery from addictive gaming on his reluctance to seek support.

"Academic and professional failure await addicted gamers," Roberts said, "even though many of them possess supremely imaginative minds. This vast waste of talent and potential is the great tragedy of video game addiction."

In addition to leading support groups, Roberts facilitates family interventions. "Some video gamers spiral out of control," Roberts said, "and many families need help to deal with the situation." Roberts, who speaks at schools, conferences and community groups, discusses solutions and strategies in his forthcoming book, Video Game Junkie: a Recovering Addict Helps You Understand, due out late May, 2008.

Roberts was a teacher at the Roeper School for the gifted in Birmingham, Mich. and has been an ADD coach and educational consultant for ten years. He speaks five languages and has a one-man show, Confessions of a Self-Help Junkie, which will debut in November.

SOURCE videogamingaddicts.org

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