University of Chicago Medical Center Chooses Proventix's nGage™ Quality Compliance Monitoring System

BIRMINGHAM, Ala., Oct. 13 /PRNewswire/ -- Proventix Systems, Inc., today announced it will partner with the University of Chicago Medical Center in an initiative to improve hand-hygiene quality and compliance monitoring. In this pilot, Proventix will install its nGage™ system on one clinical unit at the Medical Center.  

(Photo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20101013/CL80733 )

(Photo: http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20101013/CL80733 )

"We have done extensive research in this field on the products that are available for radio-frequency identification badge-based hand-hygiene compliance monitoring, and we are interested in finding a system that could become a part of our clinical culture," said Emily Mawdsley, MD, Instructor of Medicine and Associate Hospital Epidemiologist at the University of Chicago Medical Center. "We were seeking a system that included active messaging capabilities and a track record of results."

As an academic medical center, the University of Chicago is dedicated to teaching and research on quality improvement and patient safety.  Stephen Weber, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine and Chief Healthcare Epidemiologist at the Medical Center, was seeking  tools that could help identify ways to sustain high compliance with hand hygiene, a goal that has been elusive for hospitals worldwide. The nGage system was designed to help researchers like Drs. Mawdsley and Weber understand the role of individual feedback in shaping clinician behavior in hand-hygiene compliance.

The nGage technology is a "smart," touchless system that monitors hand-hygiene compliance 24-hours-a-day, 7-days-a-week without any disruption to workflow. Caregivers wear radio-frequency identification badges (RFID) that monitor hand-hygiene events upon entering and exiting a patient room. The system also includes communication screens in each patient room that can display hospital- or patient-specific information.

"In healthcare, caregivers heal with their hands," says Proventix CEO Harvey Nix. "They want to know that they are not spreading unnecessary infections with each point of contact. Proventix aims to provide them with the tools to do their jobs well while ensuring patient safety."

The University of Chicago infection prevention team chose nGage for this pilot program, which is designed to investigate how various technologies can help protect patients. Each year in the United States 1 out of every 20 hospital patients contracts a healthcare-associated infection. The Centers for Disease Control, the Joint Commission, World Health Organization and other healthcare-related organizations are placing increasing emphasis on the importance of effective hand-hygiene compliance to help reduce the spread of infection. They recognize the need for a powerful tool both to improve hand hygiene and to study the complex relationship between hand hygiene and healthcare-associated infections.

About Proventix Systems, Inc.

Proventix Systems, Inc., based in Birmingham, Alabama, is a technology company whose mission is to eliminate the human and economic costs of infectious disease in the healthcare. Proventix provide tools and services for quality compliance monitoring, active point of care communication, and successful behavior modification. For more information contact [email protected].  http://www.proventix.com.

About the University of Chicago Medical Center

The University of Chicago Medical Center, established in 1927, is one of the nation's leading academic medical institutions and is consistently recognized as a leading provider of sophisticated medical care. It is the only Illinois hospital ever to make the U.S. News and World Report Honor Roll and 11 clinical specialties ranked among the top programs nationwide.

For more information, contact:

Erin Snow

205-383-1156

[email protected]



SOURCE Proventix Systems, Inc.

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