U.S. News ranks this year's best children's hospitals

Boston Children's Hospital once again topped the list of the best children's hospitals in the country, according to U.S. News & World Report 2015-2016 annual ranking.

The publication ranked pediatric hospitals in 10 specialties, including cancer, urology, orthopedics and neonatal care. Eighty-three hospitals placed in the top 50 in one or more specialties, down from 89 in last year's list.

Of these 83 hospitals, 12 placed on U.S. News' honor roll with high scores in at least three specialties. The honor roll rankings used a point system that assigns a hospital two points for each specialty in which it placed in the top 5 percent, and one point if the organization placed in the next 5 percent. The honor roll hospitals include:

  1. Boston Children's Hospital with 20 points based on 10 specialties
  2. Children's Hospital of Philadelphia with 19 points based on 10 specialties
  3. Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, with 15 points and 10 specialties
  4. Texas Children's Hospital in Houston, with 12 points and six specialties
  5. Children's Hospital Colorado in Aurora, with seven points and six specialties
  6. Seattle Children's Hospital, with seven points and five specialties
  7. Children's Hospital Los Angeles, with six points and five specialties
  8. Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, with six points and four specialties
  9. Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, with five points and five specialties
  10. Children's National Medical Center in the District of Columbia, with five points and three specialties
  11. A tie between Children's Healthcare of Atlanta and Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, both with three points and three specialties

To learn more:
- read the rankings
- here's the honor roll

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