Study: 40 percent of diabetics in remission after gastric banding

As bariatric surgeries have become more common, health plans have waffled as to whether it makes financial sense to pay for them. Now, there's a study suggesting that, yet again, the longer-term benefit may far outweigh the cost.

The study, which was done by researchers at the New York University Medical Center, analyzed 95 diabetic patients who had laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding surgery from January 2002 to January 2004. The patients were aged 21 to 68 and had an average body mass index of 46.

Researchers found that in 40 percent of patients studied, their diabetes went into remission after a bariatric procedure known as gastric banding surgery. Five year follow-up data showed improvements in an additional 43 percent of patients getting gastric banding surgery for morbid obesity. That puts the total improvement/remission rate at 83 percent.

To learn more about this research:
- read this UPI item

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