Reform: See where different healthcare industry groups stand

Now that the Senate Finance Committee's healthcare reform bill is moving ahead, it's a good time to see where different industry groups stand. Here's what key organizations stand to lose or gain:

* American Hospital Association: While the group favors the bill's creation of health insurance co-ops and its changes to the health-care delivery system, it wants expanded health-insurance coverage.

* American Medical Association: The AMA supported the House health care bill, but it's sitting on the fence with Senate's version. The group recently encouraged members to repeal the current formula used to pay doctors who treat Medicare patients, which is included in the House but not the Senate Finance bill. AMA also called for an independent advisory commission to control Medicare spending.

* Unions: The AFL-CIO, the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees and the Communications Workers of America are unhappy that the bill lacks a government-run public option, and that it would tax expensive health insurance plans. (Some union members receive high-end coverage.)

* Pharma: The Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America calls the Senate Finance bill "the best blueprint for comprehensive healthcare and reform." Its members would benefit from the bill if more people get health insurance that includes prescription drug coverage. In exchange, the industry agreed to pay a portion of seniors' drug costs stemming from Medicare's donut hole.

* U.S. Chamber of Commerce: The U.S. Chamber of Commerce says that the Senate Finance bill "increases premiums, raises taxes and creates a new entitlement that will add to the nation's growing debt." However, it also points to the financial burden placed on employers who don't offer insurance.

For more on the story:
- read this Wall Street Journal article

Suggested Articles

The profit margins and management of Community Health Group raise questions about oversight of managed care insurers.

Financial experts are warning practices about the pitfalls of promoting medical credit cards to their patients.

A proposed rule issued by HHS on Tuesday would expand short-term coverage, a move Seema Verma said will have "virtually no impact" on ACA premiums.