Poor Indoor Air Quality Can Be Excellent Headache Trigger

ANN ARBOR, Mich., June 3 /PRNewswire/ -- According to the National Headache Foundation (NHF), the first week in June is Headache Awareness Week, and DUCTZ Indoor Air Professionals, the nation's leading air duct cleaning business, is advising consumers on the relationship between poor indoor air quality and headache triggers. According to the NHF and a report entitled Indoor Air Pollution, published by the American Lung Association (ALA), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Consumer Product Safety Commission, and the American Medical Association, the following are indoor air quality issues that can be major headache triggers:

"As indoor air professionals, the DUCTZ family sees it as our duty to go beyond HVAC reconditioning and restoration to look out for the overall well-being of our customers," said John Rotche, President of DUCTZ. "It is our hope that this advice will help the mission of National Headache Awareness Week, and help our customers avoid a potentially painful situation."

About DUCTZ:

DUCTZ, the nation's largest heating, ventilation and air conditioning restoration business, was ranked by Entrepreneur Magazine as the number one franchise in their category and the 13th top new franchise for 2008. Headquartered in Ann Arbor, Michigan, DUCTZ has over one hundred locations nationwide. From natural disasters and environmental emergencies to residential air duct cleaning, America depends on DUCTZ for indoor air quality. DUCTZ is a member of the National Air Duct Cleaners Association. For more information, or to schedule service, call 877.DUCTZ.USA (877.382.8987) or visit online at www.ductz.com.

SOURCE DUCTZ Indoor Air Professionals

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