Plaintiffs Obtain $240 Million Amended Settlement In Guidant Defibrillators Products Liability Litigation

MINNEAPOLIS, Nov. 19 /PRNewswire/ -- Co-Lead Counsel for the Plaintiffs' Steering Committee in the Guidant Medical Device Litigation announced today that an amended settlement agreement has been obtained on behalf of 8,550 patient plaintiffs who asserted claims against Guidant Corporation, Boston Scientific Corporation and other entities (hereinafter collectively, "Defendants"). The plaintiffs had claimed that Defendants knowingly sold them inherently defective defibrillator devices with potential life-threatening defects over a period of three years.

The amended settlement expands a prior agreement obtained in July 2007, which had provided for a recovery of $195 million to settle over 5,600 claims. After additional injured patients stepped forward, the agreement was amended to provide up to $240 million in compensation. The successful settlement mediation sessions were conducted before U.S. Magistrate Judge Arthur J. Boylan in Minneapolis over a 15-month period.

Charles S. Zimmerman, co-lead attorney for the Plaintiffs' Steering Committee, stated, "This amended agreement is great news for the patient plaintiffs and will provide them and their families with substantial relief. Beyond this, the settlement serves the public good by highlighting that transparency and full and proper disclosure are paramount to the public and to those regulatory bodies entrusted to protect the public's interests, particularly in the areas of public health and safety. It also highlights the need for continued and stronger regulatory oversight of companies that are in the business of manufacturing and selling life-saving devices to consumers. We believe that with these results, the settlement truly benefits all parties."

SOURCE The Guidant's Plaintiffs' Steering Committee

Suggested Articles

The profit margins and management of Community Health Group raise questions about oversight of managed care insurers.

Financial experts are warning practices about the pitfalls of promoting medical credit cards to their patients.

A proposed rule issued by HHS on Tuesday would expand short-term coverage, a move Seema Verma said will have "virtually no impact" on ACA premiums.