Obama dismisses GOP critics, says healthcare reform is working as planned

President Obama shrugged off Friday what he coined Republican "fearmongering" and said the healthcare law is working the way it's supposed to, The Hill's Healthwatch reports.

Obama criticized the GOP for using scare tactics over the effects of the healthcare law. He says early results indicate the system is working as intended, although industry experts say the true measure of the law's success will be known once new insurance marketplaces open this fall in states across the country and enrollment for the new coverage options begin.

But Obama pointed to California, as one of several states that shows early success, according to Healthwatch. Californians will be able to choose among 13 insurance companies for coverage at premiums lower than expected. In addition, marketplaces in Washington, Oregon and Vermont are expected to offer affordable premiums. "You can listen to a bunch of political talk out there, negative ads and fearmongering geared toward the next election, or alternatively you can look what's happening in states like California right now," Obama said.

But Obama acknowledged the process hasn't been as smooth in other states. The federal government has had to build all or part of the marketplaces in 33 states that refuse to set up their own exchanges. The law will work, he said, if the millions of uninsured people who don't get insurance through an employer buy coverage through the marketplaces.

He urged the uninsured to go to healthcare.gov to learn more about the marketplace options. "Even at those lower rates and better insurance that you're getting through these marketplaces you still can't afford it, you're going to be getting tax cuts and tax credits through the Affordable Care Act that will help you afford it," Obama said in a transcript of his remarks published by Kaiser Health News.

To learn more:
- read the article
- check out the video and transcript

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