Most healthcare professionals would leave jobs for better pay

Forty-five percent of healthcare workers have not received a pay raise in the last year, and nearly 3 in 4 said that they would leave their current employer for a higher paying position elsewhere, according to a new survey by Health eCareers.

And they are finding career opportunties elsewhere. An aging population and expanded coverage for all Americans under the Affordable Care Act have combined to create a surge in demand for health workers. 

Despite being tasked with more work and heavier patient loads, most healthcare professionals say they aren't rewarded with raises, according to the survey of more than 28,000 doctors, nurses, physicians and administrative personnel. "More than half--59 percent--report that their pay is the same or even lower than a year ago," the survey announcement said. "And, of the small percentage that did report an increase, most say it was due to changing employers."

Indeed, more than 40 percent of workers surveyed say they are unhappy with their current level of pay. Many said that they do not feel that their experience has earned them more money. Often, senior staff see new personnel hired at a higher pay rate than they currently earn. Employees also say they aren't being compensated for extra hours and that when salary increases do come, they are infrequent and too low.

The healthcare field is currently a job-seeker's market, the report said, with savvy workers weighing quality of life issues equally against compensation. Younger workers want more flexible hours, better training programs and more time off.

When asked about their concerns for the future, 42 percent of healthcare workers worry they won't get any pay increase or that what they do get won't keep pace with the rising costs. Other concerns include an increase in the number of patients they are expected to treat and whether they will be able to find a position that matches their skill set. 

To learn more:
- read the announcement

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