Leadership alert: Physicians feel overwhelmed, unheard

Physicians just aren't listening to their C-suite executives, and the reason is simple, according to an article in Becker's Hospital Review.

Doctors feel overwhelmed, disengaged and don't think leaders listen to them, writes author Maureen Ladouceur, vice president of health systems products, marketing and services at Quantia Inc., and a registered nurse with more than 20 years of healthcare experience.

As the healthcare environment shifts toward outcome-based care, collaboration and clinical alignment between physicians and hospitals are more important than ever, making communication and engagement between hospital leadership and physicians essential to success.

However, this is difficult when physicians face increasing pressure and difficulty in maintaining their clinical competencies, Ladouceur writes. Physicians also must see more patients, and create a bond with them in less and less time, leaving them overwhelmed and struggling to remain optimistic about healthcare reform and the future of the industry.

Instead of just communicating and informing doctors of decisions made by the C-suite, hospital leaders must:

  • Distribute information for doctors to consume

  • Offer the opportunity for doctors to interact and consult with peers regarding the information

  • Allow the time for doctors to provide feedback about the information

  • Consider differing points of view about the information

  • Help doctors apply the information in practice

Don't rely on complicated alignment contracts and email updates to try and engage your physicians, Ladouceur writes. Instead, engage them with data-driven information and give them problems to solve by offering opportunities for a two-way dialogue and empowerment.

To learn more:
- here's the article

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