Johns Hopkins to share safety strategies with 750 hospitals

surgery
Doctors at Hopkins will work with other providers to show how they provide safe care to surgical patients to improve outcomes and minimize risk for harm.

Johns Hopkins’ Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety will partner with 750 U.S. hospitals to improve surgical care under a new federal contract.

The institute will work alongside the American College of Surgeons under the program, which is funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, according to an article from The Baltimore Sun. Doctors at Johns Hopkins will work with other providers to show how they provide safe care to surgical patients to improve outcomes and minimize risk for harm.

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Johns Hopkins’ strategy, called “enhanced recovery after surgery,” was adopted by the hospital in 2013 and has been in wide use at European facilities, according to the article. It focuses on the five most common types of surgery, like colorectal procedures, and aims to send patients home sooner and reduce costs. The 750 hospitals in the program will better engage with patients and family members so that they’re better prepared for recovery care. Clinicians will monitor safety measures closely, and after the procedure will focus on getting patients up and moving as quickly as is safe.

"We know that patients usually fare better when they recover quickly from operations," Clifford Y. Ko, M.D., director of the American College of Surgeons' division of research and optimal patient care, told The Sun.

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The contract could be worth up to $16 million, with $4 million for the first year and the option for an extension for three more years at the same rate. The program is recruiting hospitals to participate, and there will be minimal cost to those that do, according to the article, though some shuffling of staff or hiring may be required to better coordinate care.

Johns Hopkins launched the Armstrong Institute in 2011, and since then it has spearheaded projects like innovating intensive care with more “smart technologies” and digital checklists that can improve outcomes at discharge.

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