Johns Hopkins acquires its first Washington-based hospital

Washington, D.C. health planning regulators approved Johns Hopkins Hospital and Health System's deal to acquire Sibley Memorial Hospital, the Baltimore Sun reports. The merger with 328-bed Sibley Memorial Hospital gives Hopkins its first foothold in Washington, D.C.

In the non-cash affiliation deal, under which Sibley will become a wholly owned subsidiary of Hopkins Medicine, the hospital will keep its name and staff, and likely add more primary-care doctors, according to Sibley spokeswoman Sheliah Roy. Final paperwork to close the deal will be signed next week, she said.

Although Hopkins is expanding into the Washington area, it does not seek to dominate the market, Hopkins Senior Vice President Steven Thompson told Washington Business Journal.

Hopkins officials said they have no plans to expand into Virginia. Comments made by Ronald Peterson, president of the Johns Hopkins Hospital and Health System, seem to rule out buyout candidates such as United Medical Center in Southeast D.C. or Dimensions Healthcare System in Prince George's County. Hopkins isn't "in a position to rescue financially fragile institutions," he said.

Hopkins has been expanding its reach in recent years. Last year it acquired Suburban Hospital in Bethesda, Md. A merger with All Children's Hospital & Health System in Tampa, Fla., is expected to close next month.

To learn more:
- read the Baltimore Sun story
- here's the Associated Press piece
- read the Washington Business Journal article

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