Healthcare jobs will grow the fastest of all industries

Of all industry sectors, healthcare jobs will grow the fastest, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) said yesterday. In fact, healthcare and social assistance will see an increase of 5.6 million jobs over the next decade, many of which located in health practitioner offices.

Between 2010 and 2020, healthcare support occupations will grow 34.5 percent, personal care and services occupations will grow 26.8 percent, and healthcare practitioners and technical occupations will rise 25.9 percent. Office and administrative support occupations will see the most new jobs at 2.3 million, although at a projected slower-than-average growth of 10.3 percent.

Regarding specific job titles, BLS predicts there will be 712,000 more registered nurses, 706,000 home health aides and 607,000 personal care aides.

The BLS forecasts for the decade's growth might be off to a slow start. Healthcare practitioners and technical occupations posted fewer advertised jobs in January, especially for general internists and family and general practitioner positions, according to Conference Board data released this week.

"One-third of the projected fastest growing occupations are related to health care, reflecting expected increases in demand as the population ages and the health care and social assistance industry grows," BLS said.

However, as the patient population ages and calls for more healthcare workers, the workforce also is getting older, Reuters reported.

For more information:
- read the Reuters article
- read the BLS press release
- check out the BLS data
- here's the Conference Board press release

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