Healthcare job growth slows in May

Healthcare job growth slowed to levels not seen since January of this year thanks to hospital jobs declining by 5,900 in May, according to new data released from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

At the beginning of May, the Bureau of Labor statistics reported that hospitals added 2,700 jobs in April to reach a seasonally adjusted 4,836,200 workers, while physician offices added 5,400 jobs for a seasonally adjusted 2,427,300 people. Reflecting the home-based care movement, home health care services saw 6,100 more jobs in April.

Meanwhile in March, an uptick in healthcare jobs came from ambulatory services, which added 15,300 jobs. The ambulatory services increase remained in May, with jobs increasing 15.3 percent.

Though 175,000 jobs added in total is a moderate gain, Heidi Sheirholz, an economist for the Economic Policy Institute, told the Jacksonville Business Journal that May's numbers are "a perfect example of the ongoing slog in the labor market."

"At this pace, it will take more than six years to get back to the pre-recession rate," she said.

Kathy Bostjancic, director of macroeconomic Analysis for The Conference Board, said in an announcement that the real story is a "sustained pickup" in the service sector, which includes healthcare jobs. 

To learn more:
- see the data
- read the Business Journal article
- check out the announcement

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