Geisinger Health System to recruit 1,500 healthcare workers nationwide

Doctor examining patient

Photo credit: Getty/kazoka30

Pennsylvania’s Geisinger Health System is casting a nationwide recruitment net in an effort to hire 1,500 doctors, nurses, support staff and advanced practitioners.

Geisinger has seen considerable growth in the past decade, growing from two facilities to 12 hospitals and expanding its service area to 45 counties, stretching into southern New Jersey. It's also nearly tripled its number of employees, the integrated health system said in a statement to the press. 

But the new recruitment drive is seeking to swell its staff 5 percent, according to the (Central Susquehanna Valley) Daily Item. The health system needs new talent at all levels, according to the article, from clerical jobs to pharmacy and research to the C-suite.

“Caring for more than 3 million patients every year takes a team,” Julene Campion, vice president of talent management at Geisinger, said in the press statement. “Every day, our 30,000 employees strive to improve that care. This responsibility has motivated Geisinger to push the boundaries of geography and healthcare innovation, grow its medical specialty and subspecialty offerings, and recruit the best and the brightest for more than 1,500 critical healthcare positions to better care for our patients in the communities we serve.”

The recruitment push follows a series of bold strokes by Geisinger that have made national news. For example, in July it implemented a new dress code based on patient feedback, as well as a money-back guarantee for patients dissatisfied with their experiences. It’s also partnered with other providers such as St. Luke’s University Health Network to improve care access for its largely rural patient population.

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